How to anonymise qualitative and quantitative data

18 Oct 2021 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Online
Training
Data skills
Workshop

The past two years has seen a huge change in expectations for researchers in how they manage and share participants’ information. There are new legal obligations, such as the GDPR, as well as a greater emphasis in sharing data after the completion of a research project. The process of anonymisation is an essential part to protect the identities of research participants while complying with these ethical and legal standards. Before sharing, archiving, or publishing data, you should ensure that all identifying and disclosive information is managed appropriately and redacted when necessary.

Join us as we critically discuss what is meant by “disclosive data” and strategies for anonymising quantitative and qualitative data. We will look specifically at key differences between anonymisation and pseudonymisation and discuss how to responsibly use and share data using a three-prong strategy for protecting participants’ identities. In this interactive workshop, you will have an opportunity to develop an anonymisation plan, test your knowledge on legal and ethical obligations, and discuss how to strike a balance between anonymisation (or pseudonymisation), access regulation, and consent.

This free workshop will consist of a 90-minute session, including presentations, exercises and questions.

Presenters: Anca Vlad and Maureen Haaker

Audience: This workshop is intended for anyone who wants to learn about data anonymisation. No preparation is necessary, however basic knowledge of research methods is assumed.

This event is part of our UK Data Service introductory training series: Autumn 2021.

This site uses cookies

Some of these cookies are essential, while others help us to improve your experience by providing insights into how the site is being used.

For more detailed information please check our Cookie notice


Necessary cookies

Necessary cookies enable core functionality. This website cannot function properly without these cookies.


Cookies that measure website use

If you provide permission, we will use Google Analytics to measure how you use the website so we can improve it based on our understanding of user needs. Google Analytics sets cookies that store anonymised information about how you got to the site, the pages you visit, how long you spend on each page and what you click on while you’re visiting the site.